Science Events at Bard

Math Study Room
Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Time:7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Learning Commons; Mathematics Program
Contact:Maria Belk
E-mail:mbelk@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7811
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Biology Tutoring Hours
Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Time:7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location:RKC pods
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Felicia Keesing
E-mail:keesing@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2331
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Math Study Room
Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Time:7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Learning Commons; Mathematics Program
Contact:Maria Belk
E-mail:mbelk@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7811
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Biology Tutoring Hours
Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Time:7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location:RKC pods
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Felicia Keesing
E-mail:keesing@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2331
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Biology Behind Bird Friendly Buildings: 
New York City Audubon's Project Safe Flight

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Felicia Keesing
E-mail:keesing@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2331
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Sleeping to Remember: Uncovering Neural Mechanisms of Memory
Thursday, February 22, 2018
We all understand the general idea that sleep is important for proper functioning of the brain and body. Studies show that good sleep supports enhanced cognitive functions, including memory, creativity, attention, mood, and promotes healthy bodily functions, including physical stamina, metabolism and cardiac activity. Recent findings have demonstrated that sleep may be especially important for the transformation of new experiences into long-term memories, a process known as memory consolidation. The UC Irvine Sleep and Cognition (SaC) lab is interested in identifying basic neural mechanisms that are critical for memory consolidation so that we can 1) understand the function of sleep, 2) reveal the processes of memory, 3) and determine the causal mechanisms of sleep-dependent memory by enhancing or erasing memories through experimental manipulation of brain activity during sleep. In my talk, I will introduce the building blocks of sleep and their relation to memory, as well as identify some of the specific electrophysiological events occurring in the central and autonomic nervous system that appear critical for memory consolidation. I hope to illustrate a dynamic relationship that exists during sleep between different brain areas, as well as between the heart and brain that facilitates the formation and long-term storage of memories.

Time:4:45 pm
Location:Preston Theater
Sponsor:Mind, Brain, & Behavior Program; Psychology Program
Contact:Tom Hutcheon
E-mail:thutcheo@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7380
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Math Study Room
Thursday, February 22, 2018

Time:7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Learning Commons; Mathematics Program
Contact:Maria Belk
E-mail:mbelk@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7811
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Biology Tutoring Hours
Thursday, February 22, 2018

Time:7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location:RKC pods
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Felicia Keesing
E-mail:keesing@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2331
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The Discovery of Global Warming
Friday, February 23, 2018

The history of how we learned about climate change offers a deep look into the way scientists work and how that has changed. When 19th-century scientists discovered the Ice Ages they came up with various explanations, including a decrease of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Could humanity’s fossil fuel emissions bring a reverse effect, global warming? The idea found only a few supporters, curious scientists who stepped aside from their usual research to develop “greenhouse gas” calculations and measurements. By 1960 they proved that the idea merited serious research. An onslaught of droughts in the early 1970s brought public attention to climate and intensified research, typically by small teams, but scientists admitted they could not even predict whether the world would get warmer or colder. This was resolved at the end of the 1970s by computer models that found global warming would become obvious around 2000. The implication that the fossil fuel industries must be radically reduced brought political pushback and scientific controversy. Crucial confirmation of the models came from a totally independent direction: research on climates of the distant past (studies that were themselves confirmed through independent lines of attack). Large-scale teamwork was now necessary to advance, and almost no climate scientist worked alone. When the world’s governments devised a novel mechanism to get scientific advice, hundreds and then thousands of experts in diverse fields managed to cooperate. By 2001 they reached a nearly unanimous consensus: dangerous climate change is all but certain within our lifetime. The focus of research turned to the impacts.

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Hegeman 107
Sponsor:Physics Program
Contact:Paul Cadden-Zimansky
E-mail:pzimansk@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7584
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How to Hire a Professor
Friday, February 23, 2018
Suppose you're one of a group of people responsible for a decision: choosing which applicant to hire into a job; deciding what food to have available at a banquet; or choosing who's going to represent you in Washington, D.C. How can you do it?  Social choice theory is the branch of mathematics that studies how groups can make decisions. We'll take a look at some problems, some solutions, and some paradoxes that result when groups try to make decisions.

Time:1:30 pm
Location:Hegeman 204
Sponsor:Mathematics Program
Contact:Lauren Rose
E-mail:rose@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-6822
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Past Events:

Math Study Room
Monday, February 19, 2018

Location: RKC 111
Sponsor: Learning Commons; Mathematics Program

Biology Tutoring Hours
Monday, February 19, 2018

Location: RKC pods
Sponsor: Biology Program

Math Study Room
Sunday, February 18, 2018

Location: RKC 111
Sponsor: Learning Commons; Mathematics Program

Biology Tutoring Hours
Sunday, February 18, 2018

Location: RKC pods
Sponsor: Biology Program

Finding Mathematics in Hridaya Kolams
Friday, February 16, 2018

There is a lot of talk about math being &lquo;everywhere&rquo; in &lquo;daily life,&rquo; and I would argue that most (all?) mathematicians understand how to find it. But the process of finding math in unexpected places is something that most of us learned by osmosis rather than consciously.

Many South Indian Hindus have at least one god in their home—a statue that they worship every day. The daily &lquo;puja&rquo; often involves making a design out of rice powder in front of the god. We will look at two variations of this design, called a Hridaya kolam. (Hridaya = heart, kolam = designs made from powder in South India.)

After learning to make the two standard designs, we will embark on an exploration to find some mathematics in them—making algorithms, generalizing, looking for structure, explaining what we find, coming up with useful notation, deciding on definitions, and so on. Different students will be free to follow different paths through the exploration.

Sunita Vatuk has a Ph.D. in differential geometry from Princeton University. As part of her teaching at the University of Colorado (Boulder), Rutgers University (Piscataway), and City University of New York she has worked extensively with high school math teachers. That work sparked an interest in the existence and nature of mathematical thinking outside of research mathematics, including but not limited to origami and textile production. This talk is based on over 80 interviews with kolam experts and hundreds of designs she learned as a Fulbright scholar affiliated with the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai.

Location: Hegeman 204
Sponsor: Mathematics Program

Math Study Room
Thursday, February 15, 2018

Location: RKC 111
Sponsor: Learning Commons; Mathematics Program

Biology Tutoring Hours
Thursday, February 15, 2018

Location: RKC pods
Sponsor: Biology Program

AMC 10/12B with the Bard Math Circle
Thursday, February 15, 2018
The AMC 10/12 is a 25-question, 75-minute, multiple choice examination in high school mathematics designed to promote the development and enhancement of problem-solving skills.

The contest is paired with an engaging math talk at the high school level, presented by a Bard mathematician.

The Bard Math Circle hosts this annual event to promote a culture of mathematical problem solving and math enrichment in the mid-Hudson Valley.


Location: Reem-Kayden Center
Sponsor: Center for Civic Engagement; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Mathematics Program
Website: View

The Influence of the Host Microenvironment on Breast Cancer Progression:
Investigations Using a Computational Biology Approach
Thursday, February 15, 2018
Cancer is influenced not only by its intrinsic properties, epigenetic, or genetic changes in its cellular properties but also by the host microenvironment. Without nutrients supplied by the host blood vessels tumors can become hypoxic and die. Other stromal cells, such as macrophages and fibroblasts, can support or antagonize tumor growth by secreting different factors that affect growth, migration, and adhesion. I examine the interplay between breast cancer cells and the surrounding host cells, including blood vessels, macrophages, and fibroblasts, using a computational modeling approach. This approach allows one to examine the individual as well as combined effects of stromal cells in a 3-D simulated environment, and to make predictions as to which targets would be the most successful for cancer therapies.
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

Math Study Room
Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Location: RKC 111
Sponsor: Learning Commons; Mathematics Program

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