Science Events at Bard

Characterization of Human T cell Response to Dengue
Thursday, February 23, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Coordinating Cognition at the Fingertips:
Insights from Investigations into Skilled Typing Ability

Thursday, February 23, 2017
I will discuss my work on the broad claim that skilled performance is controlled hierarchically by coordinated processing loops involved in higher level functions like planning and goal formation, ann at d lower level functions involved in action execution. These loops harness the full range of basic cognitive processes, such as learning, memory, and attention, that guide complex behavior in everyday tasks and expert domains such as skilled typing. I will discuss a range of questions relevant to many domains in cognition that we answer through skilled typing tasks. These include how people use spatial cognition to navigate the keyboard, how people use cognitive control to detect and correct errors and plan movements, and how people use learning and memory to become sensitive to the statistical structure of letter sequences and type words fluently with practice. Finally, I will talk about some recent new directions using EEG and TMS that test cognitive models by examining neurocorrelates of cognitive and motor control networks involved in skilled typing.

Time:4:45 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Psychology Program
Contact:Thomas Hutcheon
E-mail:thutcheo@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7380
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Locally Determined, and Not Locally Determined, Invariants of Polyhedra
Thursday, February 23, 2017

Time:4:45 pm
Location:Hegeman 308
Sponsor:Mathematics Program
Contact:John Cullinan
E-mail:cullinan@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7104
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Hunting the Brightest Galaxies in the Universe
Friday, February 24, 2017
I’ll give an overview of observing at the 50-m Large Millimeter Telescope and will focus on the latest results on distant, dusty, massive starburst galaxies in the early universe.  Studying distant galaxies lets us peer billions of years back in time, well over halfway back to the Big Bang, to learn how galaxies form and evolve.  New infra-red and millimeter-wave images and spectra from the Planck and Herschel satellites and from the LMT have helped identify the most luminous galaxies yet known, thousands of times brighter than our own Milky Way, and churning gas into new stars at a furious rate.  Many are also strongly gravitationally lensed, their images warped and amplified by intervening massive galaxies, which lets us see more detail on fainter galaxies than usual.  Hubble Space Telescope’s sharp vision further enhances our view and can finally reveal what triggers such spectacular starburst activity. 

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Hegeman 107
Sponsor:Physics Program
Contact:Hal Haggard
E-mail:hhaggard@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-7302
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Terminal Differentiation of Vomeronasal Sensory Neurons and GnRH-1 Neuronal Migration, from New Models to New Stories
Thursday, March 2, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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From Bard to Startup
Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Time:4:45 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Computer Science Program
Contact:Keith O'Hara
E-mail:kohara@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2359
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The Influence of Climate Change and Evolution on Mosquito Life History Traits and Pathogen Transmission
Thursday, March 9, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Gazed At, Groped, and Assaulted:
The Too Much Information of Being an Adolescent Girl

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Time:4:45 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Psychology Program
Contact:Thomas Hutcheon
E-mail:thutcheo@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7380
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Degradation-resistant Proteins:
Biological, Disease, and Biotechnology Implications

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakahlain
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Targeting Mitochondria for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disease
Thursday, March 30, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Past Events:

A Geometric Wieferich Conjecture
Thursday, February 16, 2017
In 1909 Arthur Wieferich proposed a way to attack Fermat's last theorem by introducing a variant on Fermat's little theorem.  His idea has since been refined and now forms what is known as the "Wieferich Conjecture".  Even though Fermat's last theorem has been proved, the Wieferich conjecture remains open and a major area of research in modern number theory.  In this talk, I will explain the Wieferich conjecture, its modern geometric interpretation, and my current research project.  This talk should be suitable for all students who are currently in Math 261 (Proofs and Fundamentals) or beyond. In particular, we will make extensive use of modular arithmetic. 

Refreshments to follow immediately in the Math Common Room.
Location: Hegeman 308
Sponsor: Mathematics Program

Our Rivers on Drugs
Thursday, February 16, 2017

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

Are You Interested in Pursuing a Career as a Health Professional?
Thursday, February 16, 2017
Join Zammy Diaz, IHN Communications Center, to learn why the one-year MS Program in Nutrition Science may be a great gap or glide year for you.
Location: Campus Center Lobby
Sponsor: Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing

Classical CD Sale
Tuesday, February 14, 2017 – Thursday, February 16, 2017

1000s of CDs including many operas
Nothing over $2.00!
Proceeds will be used to purchase furniture for the library patio.

Location: Charles P. Stevenson Jr. Library
Sponsor: Stevenson Library

Flying Boys, Defibrillated Chickens, and Death By Lightning: 
A Brief History of Electricity and Magnetism
Friday, February 3, 2017
The development of almost all modern technology relies on a firm understanding of the concepts of electricity and magnetism, and these concepts are at the heart of fundamental explanations of most physical phenomena. The historical evolution of these concepts traces back thousands of years and took a number of surprising, unorthodox, and occasionally tragic turns before the rules governing electricity and magnetism were codified. In this talk, intended for a general audience, I'll review some of the key experiments and insights of past centuries that led to our present theories.

Physics Program Social and Lunch to Follow
Location: Hegeman 102
Sponsor: Physics Program

Biology Seminar Information Session
Thursday, February 2, 2017
Attend this information session to learn about the biology speaker series for Spring 2017, including the requirements for students registered for the course.
ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY FOR REGISTERED STUDENTS
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

Mark McKinlay, Ph.D.
Monday, January 23, 2017

It would come as a surprise to many just how similar the rhinoviruses that cause the common cold are to the polioviruses that caused more than 350,000 cases of paralytic poliomyelitis worldwide each year in the 1980s. A decade before the Bard freshman class was born, Mark McKinlay, working with two research technicians at a pharmaceutical company in upstate New York, discovered a new class of antiviral agent that had the ability to stop replication of rhinoviruses in the lab. While the synthesis of hundreds of new compounds was underway to find one with the ability to inhibit the vast majority of the 99 distinct serotypes of rhinovirus, the team searched for an animal infection model in which to test the compounds. Since no accessible animal models for rhinovirus infections existed, the team looked for a related virus infection model and identified poliovirus infection in mice as an option. Poliovirus is structurally and genetically similar to rhinovirus and the new compounds had activity against both rhinovirus and poliovirus. The company tested three compounds in humans extensively before advancing pleconaril, a compound with the activity and safety needed to move it forward toward product registration. Pleconaril tablets were clinically evaluated for safety and efficacy over a 10 year period in more than 5,000 subjects. The two large registration trials resulted in the first demonstration that an antiviral could shorten the duration and efficacy of the common cold. Despite the convincing demonstration of efficacy, the FDA in 2002 made the decision to not approve pleconaril due to a potential safety concern associated with the use of pleconaril beyond the recommended 5 day dosing period.
In 2007, hope increased that poliovirus could soon be eradicated. Polio was set to be the second human virus to be eradicated after smallpox. The National Research Council held a meeting to ask the question, is there a need to develop an antiviral compound(s) as part of the eradication effort, to treat immune deficient patients who continue to excrete neurovirulent poliovirus years after receiving the live oral Sabin vaccine? The most advanced compound that has now been advanced into late stage human testing in poliovirus-infected patients is a direct descendant of the drug class first discovered by Mark’s team in the 80s to treat the common cold.
 
Location: Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater
Sponsor: Citizen Science Program

Paul Turner, Ph. D.
Thursday, January 12, 2017
Earth’s biodiversity is vast, but most of these species are microbes that are generally invisible to the eye. Despite their small size, microbes hold immense potential for addressing unanswered questions in biology, and for solving vital problems faced by humans today and in our near future. Because microbes evolved billions of years before other organisms, microbiology research can reveal how life first arose on our planet and can provide clues for signatures of life as we search for it elsewhere in the universe. Also, studying microbes is crucial for understanding how biological communities assemble and how ecosystems function, especially when these activities can be perturbed by planet-wide changes such as global warming. Last, diseases affecting humans, domesticated animals and plants, and endangered species are increasing concerns as we strive to live longer, to maintain ample and safe food for a hungry world, and to preserve biodiversity. Although some microbes cause disease, Earth’s teeming microbial diversity provides a vast ‘natural product discovery’ pipeline for finding solutions to combat pathogens and chronic diseases such as cancers. This talk presents data from microbiology studies that address these many crucial problems faced by humans, and which suggest that the solutions may be largely invisible but within our reach. 
 
Location: Stevenson Athletic Center, Main Gym
Sponsor: Citizen Science Program

Allison L. Agwu, M.D., ScM, FAAP, FIDSA
Tuesday, January 10, 2017
Over thirty years into the HIV epidemic, tools exist to prevent and control the virus and for persons living with HIV to have a normal life span.  However,  despite these advances, certain groups, particularly adolescents and young adults are disproportionately being impacted, having higher rates of infection and poorer outcomes once infected.  We will discuss the complexities of youth from a biologic, psychosocial, and developmental context, explore their increased risk for HIV, discuss disparities in HIV diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes.  Further, we will assess the priorities and unfilled gaps for clinical care and research to optimize outcomes for this population. 
 
 
Location: Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater
Sponsor: Citizen Science Program

Math Study Room
Thursday, December 15, 2016
A place to do math homework, study with classmates, or speak to a math tutor
Location: RKC 111
Sponsor: Learning Commons; Mathematics Program

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