Science Events at Bard

Targeting Mitochondria for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disease
Thursday, March 30, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Protein Folding: Seeing is Deceiving

 

Thursday, March 30, 2017
We challenge the time-honored conviction that proteins realize their native folds via specific favorable interactions, proposing instead that an imprint of the fold is selected primarily by elimination of unfavorable interactions.  Two types of energetically disfavored interactions are considered here: steric clashes and polar groups lacking hydrogen-bond partners. Both types are largely excluded from the thermodynamic population, winnowing that population progressively as the protein becomes compact.  Compaction is accompanied by the entropically favored release of solvent shells around apolar groups.  Remarkably, both solvent shell release and excluding interactions are somewhat non-specific, yet together they promote highly specific chain organization.  For example, exhaustive conformational enumeration of a test hexapeptide reduces 1.5x1012 conceivable conformations to the experimentally-determined dominant population in aqueous solution – this despite deliberate neglect of attractive interactions.
 

Time:7:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Distinguished Scientist Lecture Series
Contact:Michael Tibbetts
E-mail:tibbetts@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2309
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Canaries in the Saltmarsh:
Tidal Marsh Conservation in the Face of Sea Level Rise

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Healing, Service, Research, Activism:
An Introduction to the Health Professions

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Time:5:00 pm
Location:RKC 115
Sponsor:Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing
Contact:Frank Scalzo
E-mail:scalzo@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7222
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Psychosocial Adversity the Epigenetic Origins of Health Disparities
Thursday, April 13, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Early Life Adversity and the Risk of Depression in Young Adulthood
Thursday, April 13, 2017

Time:4:45 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Psychology Program
Contact:Tom Hutcheon
E-mail:thutcheo@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7380
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The Ecology of West Nile Virus in the United States

 

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Molecular mechanisms of SLUG-induced Chemotherapeutic Resistance in Triple-negative Breast Cancer (TNBC)

 

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Is Empathy Necessary for Morality?
Thursday, April 27, 2017
Empathy, the ability to perceive and be sensitive to the emotional states of others, motivates prosocial and caregiving behaviors, plays a role in inhibiting aggression, and facilitates cooperation between members of a similar social group. This is probably why empathy is often and wrongly confused with morality. Morality refers to prescriptive norms regarding how people should treat one another, including concepts of justice, fairness, and rights. Drawing on empirical research and theory from evolutionary biology, psychology and social neuroscience, I will argue that our sensitivity to others’ needs has been selected in the context of parental care and group living. One corollary of this evolutionary model is that empathy produces social preferences that can conflict with morality. This claim is supported by a wealth of empirical findings in neuroscience and behavioral economics documenting a complex and equivocal relation between empathy, morality and justice. Empathy alone is powerless in the face of rationalization and denial. It is reason that provides the push to widen the circle of empathy from the family and the tribe to humanity as a whole.

 

Time:4:45 pm
Location:RKC 111
Sponsor:Psychology Program
Contact:Thomas Hutcheon
E-mail:thutcheo@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7380
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Collective Dynamics of Microbes in Natural Sediment
Thursday, May 4, 2017

Time:12:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Biology Program
Contact:Arseny Khakhalin
E-mail:akhakhal@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2333
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Past Events:

Degradation-resistant Proteins:
Biological, Disease, and Biotechnology Implications
Thursday, March 16, 2017

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

Making Games Quickly:
Designing Experimental Games With Rapid Prototyping
Monday, March 13, 2017
Mike Lazer-Walker (2011) builds software tools, interactive art, and experimental games in New York. In the past, he’s worked with the MIT Media Lab’s Playful Systems research group and Pivotal Labs, and on popular apps such as Timehop and Words With Friends. As a game designer and artist, his work has been featured at events ranging from IndieCade and the Game Developer's Conference to the Smithsonian museum and NPR's All Things Considered.
Location: Avery 116
Sponsor: Computer Science Program

Visualizing Quantum Gravity:
A pictorial introduction to causal dynamical triangulations
Friday, March 10, 2017
Quantum gravity is the much sought-after synthesis of quantum mechanics and general relativity, the two pillars of contemporary physics. I will deliver an accessible introduction to the promising approach to quantum gravity called causal dynamical triangulations. Founding my presentation on the quantum mechanics of a particle, I will build an intuitive conception of the quantum mechanics of spacetime. I will survey the key results deriving from causal dynamical triangulations and broach the key question facing causal dynamical triangulations.

 
Location: Hegeman 107
Sponsor: Physics Program

Gazed At, Groped, and Assaulted:
The Too Much Information of Being an Adolescent Girl
Thursday, March 9, 2017

Location: RKC 111
Sponsor: Psychology Program

The Area of a Parabola from Archimedes to Riemann
Thursday, March 9, 2017
Come learn several historical methods to compute the area under a parabola, including approaches from Archimedes, Pascal, and Riemann. This talk is suitable for curious math students from Calculus I and beyond, and illustrates how creative approaches to problem solving can open up beautiful mathematical ideas.

 
Location: Hegeman 308
Sponsor: Mathematics Program

The Influence of Climate Change and Evolution on Mosquito Life History Traits and Pathogen Transmission
Thursday, March 9, 2017

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

From Bard to Startup
Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Location: RKC 111
Sponsor: Computer Science Program

Big Planets from Small Telescopes:
What We’re Learning About Exoplanets and How Small Observatories Are Making It Possible
Friday, March 3, 2017
Since the discovery of the first extrasolar planet a little more than 20 years ago, the list of known planets orbiting other stars has grown to more than 3,000—but we are still in the early stages of understanding the diversity of other planetary systems.  A key part of this understanding has come from studies of planets that eclipse (or “transit”) their host stars as seen from Earth.   I will explain how studies of these planets allow us to determine their radii, masses, mean densities, atmospheric composition, and the angle at which they orbit relative to the parent star’s equator, all without being able to image the planets directly.  Small telescopes (with primary mirror diameters of 0.3–1 meter) play an important role in the larger “ecosystem” of telescopes that discover and characterize these planets, and such telescopes have been instrumental in the recent discoveries of planets around very bright stars that are much hotter than the Sun, and in the just-announced discovery of seven Earth-radius planets around the ultra-cool dwarf star Trappist-1.
Location: Hegeman 107
Sponsor: Physics Program

Symmetries of Fractals
 
Thursday, March 2, 2017
A fractal is a geometric figure that exhibits a self-similar structure, meaning that the same patterns appear at a range of different scales.  In this talk, I will explore the notion of symmetry in mathematics, and then describe some symmetries of fractal shapes that reflect their self-similar structure.  The algebra of these symmetries can have certain unusual features, and I will discuss some surprising results that have been uncovered about this algebra as part of my research.  This talk should be accessible to all math majors.

Refreshments to follow immediately in the Math Common Room.
Location: Hegeman 308
Sponsor: Mathematics Program

Terminal Differentiation of Vomeronasal Sensory Neurons and GnRH-1 Neuronal Migration, from New Models to New Stories
Thursday, March 2, 2017

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

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