Science Events at Bard

Process Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Key Concepts and Selected Examples
Thursday, June 29, 2017
Pharmaceutical R&D chemistry is typically divided into two phases.  In the early drug discovery phase, medicinal chemistry is conducted to design and synthesize molecules on small scale.  Once a lead structure is selected from the large number of compounds prepared, R&D activities transition to the process chemistry phase which is concerned with the development and optimization of both the synthetic route and  individual procedures to enable large-scale production of the lead compound.  In this seminar, key concepts of process chemistry will be introduced, and selected examples of process chemistry from the Bristol-Myers Squibb portfolio will be discussed.

Time:3:00 pm
Location:Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor:Bard Summer Research Institute
Contact:Emily McLaughlin
E-mail:emclaughl@bard.edu
Phone:845-752-2355
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, September 7, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, September 14, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, September 21, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, September 28, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, October 5, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, October 12, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, October 19, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium
Thursday, October 26, 2017
September 14th
Howard Kunreuther, Wharton School University of Pennsylvania
"Climate Change and Behavioral economics: Implications for Policy"


November 30th
Brian Goldstein, Swarthmore College
"Harlem and the Roots of Gentrification, 1965-2003"
Time:4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:Olin, Room 102
Sponsor:Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact:Michele Dominy
E-mail:mdominy@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7870
E-mail to Friend

A Reading by Diane Ackerman
Monday, October 30, 2017
On Monday, October 30, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Diane Ackerman reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

At 7:00 p.m. that Monday, a free public screening of the film adaption of The Zookeeper’s Wife will be held in Preston.

The Zookeeper’s Wife, a little known true story of WWII, enjoyed months as the New York Times #1 nonfiction bestseller, and received the Orion Book Award, which honored it as “a groundbreaking work of nonfiction, in which the human relationship to nature is explored in an absolutely original way through looking at the Holocaust. A few years ago, ‘nature’ writers were asking themselves, How can a book be at the same time a work of art, an act of conscientious objection to the destruction of the world, and an affirmation of hope and human decency? The Zookeeper’s Wife answers this question.”

Diane Ackerman’s other works of nonfiction include An Alchemy of Mind, a poetics of the brain based on the latest neuroscience; Deep Play, which considers play, creativity, and our need for transcendence; A Slender Thread, about her work as a crisis line counselor; The Rarest of the Rare and The Moon by Whale Light, in which she explores the plight and fascination of endangered animals; On Extended Wings, her memoir of flying; and her bestseller, A Natural History of the Senses. Her most recent book, The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us, a celebration of the natural world and human ingenuity, and an exploration of human-driven planetary change, received the P.E.N. Henry David Thoreau Award for Nature Writing.

Several of Ackerman's books have been Pulitzer Prize and National Book Circle Critics Award finalists. She also has the rare distinction of having a molecule named after her—dianeackerone— a pheromone in crocodilians. Her essays about nature and human nature have been appearing for decades in the New York Times, New Yorker, American Scholar, Smithsonian, National Geographic, and elsewhere.

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.

Time:2:30 pm
Location:Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Sponsor:Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact:Micaela Morrissette
E-mail:mmorriss@bard.edu
Phone:845-758-7054
E-mail to Friend

Past Events:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
Thursday, June 15, 2017
Earth's iron alloy inner core was not discovered until 1936-six years after the discovery of Pluto. For many years after that little was known about this most remote part of our planet, but in the last thirty years seismologists have been revealing it has some unusual properties. The cause of these seismic inferences remains uncertain, but they provide clues about the mineral physics and dynamics of the core. This talk will review the seismic observations of the inner core, and discuss their implications for its evolution.
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Bard Summer Research Institute

Looking for Extra Dimensions in the Cosmic Microwave Background
Friday, May 19, 2017
We can only perceive four dimensions, but several standard model extensions suggest the existence of more. If that’s true, why can't we see them? One possible explanation is that these extra dimensions are compactified, meaning they have a finite length compared to the infinite standard four. Cosmology offers a very interesting possibility of finding evidence for the existence of these extra dimensions in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The CMB is an echo from the Big Bang era, and can give us important insight to the past of our universe and whether it could have included compactified dimensions.
Location: Hegeman 107
Sponsor: Physics Program

Senior Project Poster Session
Thursday, May 18, 2017
Join Science, Mathematics & Computer graduating seniors in presenting their senior projects.
Location: Reem-Kayden Center
Sponsor: Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing

STUDENT TALKS
Thursday, May 18, 2017
Virginia Caponera
“The Insectivore's Dilemma: An Assessment of the Potential Role of Red-backed Salamander Predation on Tick Populations”

Biz Osborne-Schwartz
“Attachment Affinity of Vibrio cholerae to Resistant Starches: Testing the Benefit of Adding Resistant Starches to an Oral Rehydration Therapy”

Abiba Salahou
“A Novel Approach for Exploring the Effects of Fluoxetine on Xenopus laevis tadpole Feeding Behavior”
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

Middle Eastern Studies 
Open House 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Come celebrate the end of the year with fellow MESers. Meet faculty, hear about exciting new courses, study abroad programs, senior projects, and a number of incredible iniatives MES students are working on. Snacks will be served. All are welcome.
Location: Kline, Faculty Dining Room
Sponsor: Middle Eastern Studies Program

Marco Spodek senior recital
Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Location: Blum Hall
Sponsor: Music Program

Astronomy Night:
Jupiter over Montgomery Place
Tuesday, May 16, 2017
Join us at the Montgomery Place visitor center for a short talk from Prof. Eleni Kontou on the the latest science from NASA’s Juno probe of Jupiter, followed
by telescope viewing of Jupiter and its moons, a guided tour of the night sky, and a round of ask-a-physicist-anything.

Busses to the Event leave from Kline South Stop at
8:15 & 8:30 pm

Clear Weather Permitting.
Location: Montgomery Place, Mansion
Sponsor: Physics Program

Galactic Exploration with Invisible Light
Friday, May 12, 2017
Radio astronomy has greatly enhanced the range of observable astronomical phenomena.  Although a wide range of wavelengths are used in radio astronomy, one of the most important is 21 cm, which corresponds to the hyperfine transition in atomic hydrogen.   Although the 21 cm signal from a small collection of hydrogen atoms is exceedingly weak, and the density of hydrogen in the Milky Way is very low, the Galaxy is a big place and contains enough hydrogen to produce a signal that can be detected with a modest terrestrial apparatus.    In this talk, I will present results obtained at 21 cm with a recently refurbished cold-war-era 60-foot dish antenna.   Data from the dish will be used to measure the Sun's velocity with respect to the average velocity of nearby stars and to infer the existence of dark matter.    Time permitting, pulsar signals will be presented and schematic plans for a kit capable of detecting indirect evidence for dark matter for costing less than $1000 will be presented.
Location: Hegeman 107
Sponsor: Physics Program

Fragments, Fungi, and Feedbacks:
Can Fungal Pathogens Help Maintain Prairie Plant Diversity in Fragmented Landscapes?
Thursday, May 11, 2017

Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Biology Program

Simple Solutions for (and from) Materials Science
Tuesday, May 9, 2017
In this seminar I will discuss the apparent correlation between impact – whether academic, technological, or scientific – and simple solutions. While defining “simplicity” is a notoriously poorly defined problem that is maybe more suited to philosophy than science, defining “simple solutions” can be, we contend, done effectively and, more importantly, usefully: i.e., it can be defined in a way that facilitates its pursuit. For example, simple solutions can be defined in terms of their potential virtues, e.g., low cost, reliability, and “stackability” (i.e., they can be combined and compounded with little increase in complexity).
If you believe that impact is correlated with “simple solutions” and that we now have a useful way to define them, the question becomes “how do we pursue them?”. While simple solutions can be easily distinguished when first used, it is notoriously hard, especially in research, to devise a systematic approach to pursuing them. Over the past 5 years we have been interested in developing simple solutions for materials science or through materials science: we have witnessed first-hand the difficulty of this task and our experience might be valuable to those that have similar interests.
In this talk I will therefore describe what we have learnt about the pursuit of simple solutions by discussing examples (published and unpublished) of simple solutions from our own laboratory concerning five problems of general scientific and technological interest:
1. How do we produce materials with completely programmed nanostructure?
2. How do we synthesize nanomaterials on a large, industrial, scale?
3. How do we produce superhydrophobic coatings on large areas outdoors?
4. How do we produce transparent soil to enable the study of the soil environment?
5. How do we redesign the Petri dish to enable the study of organismal interactions?
Location: Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
Sponsor: Chemistry Program

Why Study at Bard

Instrumentation

The Major

Courses

Faculty

Student Research

Science Events at Bard

Chemistry Links

Safety Documentation

Home